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HTML5 Gathers Pace On Mobile But Lags Behind On Desktops

by Naresh Sarwan on June 21, 2010

As discussed on the Sencha blog last week in this article by Michael Mullany, HTML5 is gathering pace and rapidly becoming commonplace on mobile devices due to the widespread use of the Webkit browser engine and because replacement rates are much faster than desktop or notebook PCs.

Not only are product life cycles much quicker (people replace their phone on average every 18 months), but tablets, phones and touch devices are practically on another planet when it come to their browser technology. And that’s because the default browser on every device that matters is based on Webkit.” [Read More]

On desktop/notebook computers, IE 6-8 and Firefox still proliferate and their support for HTML5 is practically non-existent:

The truth is that there is a huge bifurcation in the web browser population evolving. On the desktop, Internet Explorer and Firefox between them have at least 80%+ of the market. Internet Explorer support of HTML 5 Family technologies is practically non-existent, and Firefox is lagging in CSS3 implementation. But in any case, there is an enormous installed base of IE 6,7,8 on the desktop — particularly in the Enterprise — and no sane application developer would develop an application for the Enterprise desktop that didn’t run on IE7 at the very least. Except for forward thinking organizations, who deploy latest revision Firefox, Chrome or Safari for their employees, HTML5 technologies are a non-starter.” [Read More]

As discussed in earlier articles on the subject of HTML5 (and as pointed out by some commentators) there appears to be a dual speed HTML5 adoption process taking place which is not helped by the lack of widely supported standards.  The question is how long the disparity between corporate (enterprise) and consumer (mobile) support can persist without either older technologies being widely and rapidly abandoned or innovations being driven by the mobile market stalling due to a lack of momentum?

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